Internal Measures

Best Start in Life


From September 2015, for local authorities, there has been a requirement for health visiting services and early years providers to bring together health and early education reviews for young children at the age of two to two-and-a-half. Children at this age have been going through a time of rapid development. Therefore, this is a time when it is important to identify if a child is in need of any additional support, as soon as these needs are starting to emerge, in order to minimise the impact of any delay. Getting appropriate support at this stage will enable children to make the best progress and reduce the likelihood of secondary difficulties. Bringing together the existing health and education reviews at age two will strengthen the quality of assessments by drawing together different professional views as well as the views of the family who know their child best.

June 2018 performance
The performance relation to Child and Family Assessments completed in 45 working days is above target (85%). The performance has consistently been above target since October 2017. There has been a focus on performance within Assessment and Intervention, with Practice Managers supporting social workers to understand the impact of performance on practice.

Working Together 2015 requires that an Initial Child Protection Conference is held “within 15 working days of the of the strategy discussion at which S47 enquiries were initiated”.  In alignment with this, the Pan Sussex Child Protection and Safeguarding Procedures Manual states the following:
5.2.4 - The Initial Child Protection Conference should take place within 15 working days of the Strategy Discussion or, where more than one Strategy Discussion took place, of the Strategy Discussion at which the Section 47 Enquiry was initiated.

Publically released DfE provisional results  data for local authorities and regions at Key Stage 4 are not due until mid-October 2018, as will be reported on in November. Revised GCSE and equivalent results, including pupil characteristics, will be released at the end of January 2019 and will be reported on in February.
Source: School Census
(1)  The number of permanent exclusions for each school type expressed as a percentage of the number (headcount) of pupils (including sole or dual main registrations and boarding pupils) in January 2016.
 (2)  The number of fixed period exclusions for each school type expressed as a percentage of the number (headcount) of pupils (including sole or dual main registrations and boarding pupils) in January 2016.
 (3)  The number of pupil enrolments receiving one or more fixed period exclusion for each school type expressed as a percentage of the number (headcount) of pupils (including sole or dual main registrations and boarding pupils) in January 2016.
(4)  National and regional totals and totals across each local authority have been rounded to the nearest 10. There may be discrepancies between totals and the sum of constituent parts.

This measure relates to a key objective in the county’s SEND Strategy 2016-19 and in the Education & Skills’ business plan, to increase the percentage of children with Education Health & Care Plans (not all children with Special Educational Needs and Disability -SEND) in mainstream schools in West Sussex. Last year our performance was 31% and nationally 36%. The national data is published every May. 

Prosperous Place


2017 performance
Aspire is currently rated 2 by Ofsted which is GOOD.
This measure will only be triggered by the next Ofsted inspection which may be any time in the next 4 years.

Compliance with Traffic Management Act Permitting over runs is an indicator which picks up roadworks that are delivered late. In other words they have over run the time agreed to complete the works. This is an important indicator because it measures unnecessary delays on the highway network.

This measure monitors performance on defect repairs completed within agreed period on reactive works, within the highway term maintenance contract. It measures how many defect repairs were completed on time. This is an important indicator because it measures the efficiency of the term maintenance contract in delivering reactive works on time. It combines the performance of the contractor on  works which are ordered for completion within 2 hours, 5 days and 28 days and rolls this up into a single measure.
 Accessible;  A rolled up indicator, reflecting performance on defect repairs, made up from  KPIs 5.2, 5.3 and 5.4  – Task Orders completed within agreed period (2 hour and 5 day make safe and repair, and 28 day permanent repair)

It is important that businesses have quick access to regulatory compliance advice and information in order to make relevant commercial decisions. Trading Standards aims to respond directly to business support requests within 3 days. 

A Strong, Safe and Sustainable Place


The measure, and target, has been derived from local data on the background of people who, using Public Health funded smoking cessation services, have quit smoking.
 West Sussex, overall, is a relatively wealthy and healthy county, but we have deprived groups and communities. Using the Index of Deprivation 2015 an estimated 9.7% of the population is income deprived (i.e. incomes at or below 60% of median incomes). We know, from national evidence and survey data, that people from deprived backgrounds are more likely to smoke.
Using the data, whilst we know that the majority of people who quit smoking in West Sussex will not be from deprived backgrounds, we want to ensure that the current proportion of quits from deprived groups is maintained or increased, and that this is sustained in any future service change.
 Data are available on an annual basis.

A monthly measure of the percentage of dwelling fires in West Sussex where it is recorded that there is no smoke alarm present.‘
Dwelling' means a property that is a place of residence i.e. occupied by households, excluding hotels, hostels and residential institutions. Includes non-permanent structures used solely as a dwelling, such as houseboats and caravans.

Quarter 1 - June 2018
April 77.8%, May 81.6%. These figures relate to fire kept to room of origin. This is an important KPI which require all three PP&R elements of FRS operations to improve performance.
Response: Continued progress is being made to introduce new firefighting technologies and tactics, which should suppress fire development earlier, such as ultra-high pressure firefighting jets, door curtains and misting spikes. New ‘firefightership’ courses have been delivered over the last 6 months and will be further supported around these new techniques.
Protection: Continued lobbying for sprinkler systems and building regulation approval to improve building compartmentation.
Prevention: A planned public prevention campaign, to encourage residents and building owners to close doors, particularly at night, ‘close before you doze’.  This has been delayed due to the loss of dedicated prevention campaigns resources.

Critical Special Services are non-fire emergency incidents such as Road Traffic Collisions or persons trapped in machinery. The nature of these incidents does not generally follow a geographical correlation. Safe systems of work can be put in place at these incidents with only one appliance in attendance and therefore the arrival of the first appliance only will be measured.
It must be remembered that these standards are a target - we will always endeavour to arrive as quickly as possible.
Our target for this measure is 80%.
The emergency response standards for West Sussex were agreed through consultation with the public in 2008. These standards include the call handling time for Fire Control Operators to receive 999 calls, gather incident information and mobilise the nearest available fire crews, as well as their travel time. Using our risk map we set a more challenging performance standard for higher risk areas, and we categorise incidents as ‘critical’ or ‘non-critical’. In general terms critical incidents are those with a higher risk of harm to people or property (fires in residential or business premises for example) whereas a small fire in a waste bin or in grassland would normally be ‘non-critical’.

Safe Drive Stay Alive is aimed at 16-18 year-old students who are either already driving or learning to drive. It is a hard-hitting stage show that aims to reduce the number of young people who are killed or seriously injured on our roads. The show combines narrative film footage of a group of teenagers whose journey ends in tragedy with real life stories brought bravely to the stage by those people whose lives have been changed forever by a car crash.
For more information please view our website .

June 2018 performance
10 (10.8%) children out of the 93 leaving care in this quarter were adopted, which is double the number of those adopted in the previous quarter. As this internal measure looks at quarters in isolation, a small number of children adopted can have a significant impact on the percentage reported. On 30th June 2018 there were 44 children placed for adoption with no Adoption Order, which is second highest only to Q4 last year, from 2016 onwards. This indicates that the number of children likely to be adopted in this financial year is likely to increase. Therapeutic and financial support is being offered to families to enable them to apply for adoption, and plans are monitored by independent reviewing officers with the support of adoption and children looked after social workers to ensure applications are progressed in a timely manner.

The service has continued to strive against this measure to maintain current performance. The housing market is incredibly competitive and for young people to be able to access the sector, WSCC is having to provide six months rent in advance and act as guarantor. There has also been an increase in staying put  within West Sussex and the net result of this is young people are staying in foster care for longer.
 An additional contributory factor is that West Sussex  has a relatively high number of Unaccompanied Asylum Seekers who hold the status of No Recourse to Public Funds, so therefore West Sussex provides suitable accommodation.

June 2018 performance
In June we have taken delivery of 4 Renault Zoe Dynamique R90 ZE40 electric vehicles. These are zero emission vehicles.

The total Household waste recycled, reused or composted is often shortened to the “recycling rate” and is a government prescribed calculation method involving combining recycling and composting materials collected via the County Council’s Household Waste Recycling Sites (HWRSs) and the amount collected by District and Borough partners through the kerbside systems and recycling banks and collected via street cleaning. It also includes household items verified as reused via community groups and other outlets and metals recovered during the treatment of refuse at the Council’s Mechanical Biological Treatment facility at Warnham. The rate is calculated by dividing the amount of material in these categories versus the total household waste generated.
 There was a significant improvement in the recycling rate in 2017/18 primarily due to a number of County Council initiatives: the recycling of street sweepings and improvements in the amount of wood recycled through the HWRSs.  

Libraries have always provided a customer facing venue from which partners and other services can deliver their services, reach out to communities and meet face to face with residents. Examples of some of those range from:
  • services permanently located in some of our libraries e.g. some have permanent or regular registration offices - police offices, housing benefit surgeries, CAB (Citizen Advice Bureau) offices, Children and Family centre services (toys lend by libraries) and communication devices lent by us on behalf of SEND services.
  • Services with a regular pattern of delivering services from libraries e.g. Recovery College, social prescribing, Mental Wellbeing drop in’s and many more
  • One-off delivery via libraries – domestic abuse awareness sessions, fostering recruitment, recycling talks, dementia support drop in’s
The three above we count by asking libraries which new or additional services they have provided an access point to.
  • Then there are also those services using libraries to promote themselves e.g. Recycling colleagues using our RFID (Radio frequency Identification) gates to advertise recycling, posters, leaflets. But we don’t count all of these as there would be too many.
We have provided access to over 50 additional services via libraries in the first 9 months of this year (17 – 18) – final figure for the year not known yet.

From April 2018, the Council will introduce a new crowd funding model through which the Community Initiative Fund (the Council’s grant support to voluntary and community groups) will be deployed. A West Sussex presence on the Spacehive platform will provide a digital space for groups to crowd fund for projects that are important to them. This infrastructure enables groups to extend their fundraising reach – giving residents, businesses, partner agencies, other funders and the County Council the opportunity to pledge support. Support sessions, training, resource guides, promotional efforts, and staff support will be provided to help groups to engage with the new approach. The Council will also work to attract other local funders to the platform – the more funds that are available through the platform, the more attractive it will be for local voluntary and community groups to use. It is anticipated that use of the site will increase as support and promotional efforts for the changed approach gain traction, groups become more confident at using the platform, and visible success stories are shared.

West Sussex County Council, as a statutory food authority, is required to develop an annual Statutory Food and Feed Plan to address all areas of operational food and feed service delivery by the Trading Standards Service. This measure monitors the progress of the Service in delivering against the planned interventions in the statutory plan.


The Trading Standards Service aims to tackle traders in West Sussex supplying illicit tobacco or alcohol, or supplying age restricted goods to young persons. This measure monitors the progress of the Service in intervening with identified traders suspected to be operating in this way.

Independence for Later Life


Reablement is an approach that helps people recover skills and confidence to live at home, maximising their level of independence so that their need for on-going care support can be appropriately minimised. This combined measure shows how well the Community Reablement Service (CRS) and the Regaining Independence service (RIS) working in partnership, is able to prevent people needing on-going care support (Aim achieve) or reduce (by more than 10%) their level of care support.

A safeguarding concern is where a local authority is notified about a risk of abuse. Some of these concerns will lead to a Section 42 enquiry.
 A Section 42 enquiry is where the person meets the criteria under Section 42 of the Care Act and an enquiry takes place. ALL three key tests must be met:
(i) The adult has needs for care and support (whether or not the authority is meeting any of those needs)
(ii) The adult is experiencing or is at risk of abuse or neglect and
(iii) As a result of those needs is unable to protect themselves against the abuse or neglect or the risk of it.

Public Health England (PHE) now call it the “inequality in life expectancy at birth” although it is fundamentally the same measure as the Slope of inequality. 
This is the official definition given by PHE “This indicator measures inequalities in life expectancy within English local authorities. For each local authority, life expectancy at birth is calculated for each local deprivation decile based on Lower Super Output Areas (LSOAs). The slope index of inequality (SII) is then calculated based on these figures. The SII is a measure of the social gradient in life expectancy, i.e. how much life expectancy varies with deprivation. It takes account of health inequalities across the whole range of deprivation within each local authority and summarises this in a single number. This represents the range in years of life expectancy across the social gradient from most to least deprived, based on a statistical analysis of the relationship between life expectancy and deprivation across all deprivation deciles.” 

Public Health England (PHE) now call it the “inequality in life expectancy at birth” although it is fundamentally the same measure as the Slope of inequality. 
This is the official definition given by PHE “This indicator measures inequalities in life expectancy within English local authorities. For each local authority, life expectancy at birth is calculated for each local deprivation decile based on Lower Super Output Areas (LSOAs). The slope index of inequality (SII) is then calculated based on these figures. The SII is a measure of the social gradient in life expectancy, i.e. how much life expectancy varies with deprivation. It takes account of health inequalities across the whole range of deprivation within each local authority and summarises this in a single number. This represents the range in years of life expectancy across the social gradient from most to least deprived, based on a statistical analysis of the relationship between life expectancy and deprivation across all deprivation deciles.” 

Need  context

need context

The Council wishes to increase the number of people who chose to take their personal budget as a direct payment. Direct payments are a key element of the personalisation agenda; enabling people to have more choice and control over how their support is delivered to meet their care and well-being outcomes.
The Council has recently introduced prepaid cards to simplify the process of receiving and managing a direct payment and to make direct payments more accessible to people who may have been prevented from having one in the past because of the requirement to open a bank account.
There are however a shortage of personal assistants across the county and the Council will be working with a range of partners to widen the types of services in the market and to support innovative ideas for increasing the availability of personal assistants.

The Council wishes to increase the number of people who chose to take their personal budget as a direct payment. Direct payments are a key element of the personalisation agenda; enabling people to have more choice and control over how their support is delivered to meet their care and well-being outcomes.
The Council has recently introduced prepaid cards to simplify the process of receiving and managing a direct payment and to make direct payments more accessible to people who may have been prevented from having one in the past because of the requirement to open a bank account.
There are however a shortage of personal assistants across the county and the Council will be working with a range of partners to widen the types of services in the market and to support innovative ideas for increasing the availability of personal assistants.

WSCC Trading Standards Service receives intelligence, as part of a National Trading Standards project, as to which potentially vulnerable West Sussex households may be losing money by responding to scam mails. A pro-active intervention is initiated locally by the Service to break this cycle of repeat victimisation and to educate and support the householder and their friends/family. This measure monitors the progress of the Service in intervening with all identified households.
 

A Council that works for the Community


First Contact Resolution - the aim is for the customer to only need to contact the Council once, even if further action is required within the Council to resolve the enquiry. For example: a customer reports a pothole by telephone, the advisor assess the situation, raises a report in the system and informs the customer that the time it will take for the pothole to be filled. There is no need for the customer to contact us again providing the pothole is filled within the timeline given. This measure is currently based on data collected in the Customer Service Centre.