Quarter 2 - September 2018 performance
There has been a significant reduction in the percentage reoffending from 41.2% in Quarter 1 to 33.8% for Quarter 2. This places West Sussex Youth Offending Service (YOS) below the average for our statistical neighbours, the South East region, the Sussex PCC areas and national percentage. As such West Sussex is in the second quartile, so achieving our target. There has also been a reduction in the reoffending rate per reoffender from 4.7 in Quarter 1 to 4.23 in Quarter 2. However, West Sussex remains above our regional and statistical neighbours, as well as the national average. This places West Sussex in the third quartile of our statistical neighbours and below the proposed target for March 2022. Local tracker data, which provides a more current and accurate picture, indicates the percentage reoffending is 22% and the rate per reoffender as 2.68. However, there continues to be a small cohort of children (3.1%) committing the majority of further offending (36.6%).
Analytical work on the characteristics of the small reoffending cohort has just been completed. This will be reviewed to establish if there should be any further changes or adaptations to the operation of the YOS, so as to further improve our reoffending percentage and rate. The service is in the process of embedding a new operating model which is focused on identifying those children most likely to reoffend and providing more effective interventions. Central to this is the use of trauma informed approaches, given the increasing evidence regarding the effectiveness of this approach to address reoffending by children with the most complex and challenging behaviours.
Quarter 1 - June 2018 performance
The current Ministry of Justice (MoJ) methodology for measuring reoffending is based on a 3 month cohort who are tracked for a 12 month period.  The most recent data available is for children and young people, aged 10 to 17, who received a substantive outcome (Youth Caution/Youth Conditional Caution or Court Order) or who were released on a custodial licence between 1st April 2016 and 30th June 2016. There is a delay of a year before data is made available due to the need to wait for outcomes for any offences committed during the year they are tracked. The fact this data is collected on a three month basis can lead to a fluctuation and inflation of the actual reoffending rates, as the same child or young person could reoffend in different quarters and as such be counted more than once.
 Based on the current MoJ data, the percentage children and young people in West Sussex reoffending is lower than the rest of Sussex, the South East and nationally, but is higher than those areas classed as our statistical neighbours. West Sussex continues to have a higher reoffending rate per reoffender than our comparators. Both the percentage and rate have increased for this cohort compared to the Jan – Mar 16 cohort, where reoffending was at 35.1% and the rate was 4. However, this was a decrease from the Oct - Dec 15 cohort, demonstrating the fluctuating nature of this measure. In addition to the MoJ data, local tracker data is being used to collect an annual reoffending rate, in which children and young people are only included in the cohort once. This provides more recent and accurate data. The most recent local tracker data indicates that 6.3% of the YOS caseload, which is 18 children and young people, are committing 59.3% of all further offending. This data also indicates that the average number of re-offences per reoffender is 3.44 with the majority of children and young people known to the YOS, 74.6%, not reoffending. Both data sets maintain the current analysis and trend that the majority of reoffending is committed of a small cohort of complex children and young people, the majority of which have had no or limited previous convictions. This suggests that those committing a high number of further offences do not have long criminal histories within the Youth Justice System.
 To address this trend, further analysis is currently being undertaken to identify the key characteristics of this small cohort, so improving the ability of the YOS to identify, assess and intervene with the children and young people who are most likely to reoffend at an earlier stage. The operation of the YOS has been reviewed, resulting in the creation of a centralised, specialist team who will complete all initial assessments and make recommendations as to the most suitable interventions to reduce reoffending and harm in the community. Individually tailored programmes will build on current strengths whilst responding to the child or young person’s needs and risk, rather than the work with the child being determined by the type of intervention or Order they are subject to. The service is also developing a trauma informed approach to working with these children and their families, given the increasing national evidence as to the effectiveness of this approach.  
Quarter 4 - March 2018 performance
The current Ministry of Justice (MoJ) methodology for measuring reoffending is based on a 3 month cohort who are then tracked for a further 12 month period.  The most recent data available is for children and young people aged 10 to 17 who received a substantive outcome (Youth Caution/Conditional Caution or Court Order) or who were released on Licence between 1st Jan 2016 and 31st March 2016. There is a delay of a year before data is made available due to the need to wait for outcomes for any offences committed during the year they are tracked. Only offences resulting in substantive outcomes are included in the reoffending data. The fact this data is collected on a three month basis can lead to a fluctuation and inflation of the actual reoffending rates, as the same child or young person could reoffend in different quarters and as such be counted more than once.
Based on the current MoJ data, West Sussex continues to have a higher reoffending rate per reoffender than our comparators, but the percentage reoffending is much lower, continuing to suggest a smaller, but more prolific, cohort of children who offend.  Both the percentage and rate have declined for this cohort compared to the Oct 2015 to December 2015 cohort (which was a rate of 4.27 and 37.3% reoffending). In addition to the MoJ data, local tracker data is being used to collect an annual reoffending rate, in which children and young people are only included in the cohort once. This provides more recent and accurate data. The local tracker data is also reflecting this trend of a small cohort of complex and challenging children and young people, 4.2% of the YOS caseload, who commit 50% of the reoffending. Further, the majority of these children and young people had no previous convictions suggesting that not all those committing a high number of further offences have long criminal histories within the Youth Justice System.
 To address this trend, further analysis is planned to identify the key characteristics of this small cohort so as to enhance the service’s ability to identify, assess and intervene with the children and young people who are most likely to reoffend at an earlier stage, in order to try to divert them from offending and causing harm to the community. Individually tailored intervention programmes are developed to build on current strengths whilst responding to the child or young person’s needs and risk, rather than intervention being dictated by the type of intervention or Order the child is subject to. The service is also begin to develop a trauma informed approach to working with these children and their families, as there is increasing national evidence as to the effectiveness of this approach

Quarter 3 - December 2017 performance

The most recent data available is for young people aged 10 to 17 who received a substantive outcome (Youth Caution/Conditional Caution or Court Order) or who were released on Licence between 1 October 2015 and 31 December 2015 and have been tracked for further offending for 12 months.

Local tracker data is being used to collect an annual reoffending rate. To date this has demonstrated a small cohort of children and young people (4.6%) are responsible for the majority of reoffences (51.2%), committing on average 3.25 offences. Further, the majority of these children and young people had no previous convictions suggesting that not all those committing a high number of further offences have long criminal histories within the Youth Justice System.

Background
The current Ministry of Justice (MoJ) methodology for measuring reoffending is based on a 3 month cohort who are then tracked for a further 12 month period. Reoffending data is based on the number of children and young people, aged 10 to 17, who receive a substantive outcome, e.g. a Youth Caution, Youth Conditional Caution, Court Order, or who were released on a custodial licence during the relevant quarter. Only offences resulting in substantive outcomes are included in the reoffending data. The data produced indicates the percentage of children and young people who reoffend, as well as a reoffending rate. The reoffending rate is the average number of new offences committed per child or young person that reoffends. This data is always two years out of date as the children are tracked for one year and then it is necessary to wait a further year to ensure all offences have received an outcome. As this data is collected on a quarterly basis, this can lead to a fluctuation and inflation of the actual reoffending rates, as the same child or young person could reoffend in different quarters and as such be counted more than once. In addition to the MoJ figures, local tracker data is being used to collect an annual reoffending percentage and rate for the Youth Offending Service. In this case children and young people are only including in the cohort once and tracked over the course of a year. This provides more recent and accurate data and should be considered and contrasted with the MoJ performance data.