Quarter 2 - September 2018
The first six months of 2018 were broadly similar to 2017; there have been fewer reported road traffic injury collisions, 919, down 19 from 938.  While there were fewer people killed in road accidents, 9 in the first six months of 2018 against 13 in the same period in 2017, the number of number of people seriously injured rose slightly to 228, an increase of 14.
Most recently we have supported Operation Edward (European day without a road death) and are promoting the Space Invader initiative lead by Highways England to highlight tailgating behaviours.  Works to introduce a safety scheme on the A285 consisting of constructing sections of hard strip safety edge at the side of the road to help in cases of driver error,  introducing a ribbed edge line, similar to the ones found on motorways and dual carriageways and  making the lane widths more consistent  
Quarter 1 - June 2018
The first four months of 2018 were broadly similar to the start of 2017; there have been fewer reported road traffic injury collisions, 567, down 39 from 606.  While there were fewer people killed in road accidents, 5 in the first four months of 2018 against 9 in the same period in 2017, the number of number of people seriously injured rose slightly to 134.
We seek to reduce the harm from road traffic collision in a number of different ways including an engineering programme that addresses identified areas with higher occurrences of collisions and by building cycle ways and pedestrian crossings.  As a contributor to the Sussex safer Roads Partnership we are involved in delivering a broad range of road safety education and publicity initiatives across the whole of Sussex.
Quarter 4 - March 2018 performance
There were 100 fewer reported injury collisions reported in West Sussex in 2017 than in 2016, though the number of fatal and serious casualties remained broadly similar with 24 deaths (4 fewer than in 2016) and 453 serious. 
A programme of engineering interventions is being developed to improve locations that are identified as having a high number of collisions. 
The current route priority assessment process is being reviewed with the intention of introducing a new mechanism to develop a forward programme of safe systems interventions based on route quality, traffic flow and collision record.

Background

1. Introduction
In May 2011 the former coalition government published a Strategic Framework for Road Safety[1]. Within this the following key indicators were proposed for use in comparing performance between different local authorities:
  • Number of killed or seriously injured (KSI) casualties
  • Rate of KSI casualties per million people
  • Rate of KSI casualties per billion vehicle miles
The Department for Transport have continued to publish annual results for each local authority for each of these key indicators, the most recent of which was on 28 September 2017[2]. This note provides a summary of how West Sussex is doing in comparison to the rest of England, and in comparison to the CIPFA Near Neighbours by local authorities. The data is presented in Charts 1 to 3 below.
2. Number of killed and seriously injured casualties
It can be seen from Chart 1 that there was an increase of 11% in West Sussex in 2016 compared to the baseline average for 2010 to 2014 (which is used by the Department for Transport for comparison purposes). This increase in West Sussex is above the 8% increase across England, and is representative of the 12% increase across the South East. West Sussex was ranked 6th out of the 16 comparison local authorities on this measure.  
Chart 1
Chart 1

3. Rate of Killed or seriously injured casualties per million people

It can be seen from Chart 2 that West Sussex had a greater number of KSIs per million population (572) compared to the whole of England (414) and compared to the whole of the South East (514). West Sussex was ranked 10th out of the 16 comparison local authorities on this measure.
Chart 2

4. Rate of killed or seriously casualties per billion vehicle miles

It can be seen from Chart 3 that West Sussex had a higher number of KSIs per billion vehicle miles (103) compared to the whole of England (82) and the South East (83). West Sussex was ranked 15th out of the 16 local authorities on this measure
Chart 3

5. Conclusions

The Department for Transport have advised that a large number of police forces changed their reporting systems in 2016, (West Sussex has not yet changed), and this appears to have resulted in an increase in the proportion of casualties that are being recorded as serious. This has made time series comparison of recent years problematical.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/strategic-framework-for-road-safety

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/ras41-reported-casualties-rates